The Laeotropic Aspect

Links


The Dailies; or, What's on my Mozilla Bar
My LJ. - I know it's trite, but it's how I keep track of people; I've met all but three people on my list, and I know well most of them anyhow.
My DeviantArt space. - Not too much there, but sometimes...I've put some objects into sketches as well.
My del.icio.us page. - Just started using it, but I hope to use it more in the near future.

Old Strangeness
Eastern State Penitentiary - I'm a member! This is one of those old prisons that were supposed to be innovative in the 19th century. Now you have to tour it with a hard hat and sign a waiver. They do an awesome Halloween show...
The Muetter Museum at the College of Physicians in Philadelphia - Go here. Don't think about food for a while after you do, though.
Brian's Page of Antique Weirdness - These are images - woodcuts, photos, even some stereo-opticons of 'strangeness'. The sections tend to run to a bit of the NSFW type, but as far as historical oddities go, this is a nifty pictorial collection.
National Marine Fisheries: Historic Image Collection - Do you like old scientific-type drawings? Do you like the ocean? You know you do.
The Virtual Laboratory - A very large, very useful site regarding science from the 1830s-1930s. I use the 'Library' section where there are scans of old medical and psychological equipment trade catalogs. Lots of German on this site, obviously, other texts mostly in French and English.

Music, Literature, and Art
The Darkest of the Hillside Thickets - This is listenable, even catchy, music (not non-English death metal) that makes a thousand correct Lovecraft references. I also admire a band that does soundtracks for non-existent movies. Wacky. Canadian. Obscure to the ends of the earth.
The HP Lovecraft Historical Society
Book-A-Minute: The Collected Works of H. P. Lovecraft - har, har.
A Nine Inch Nails Metropolis - both old and new.
Surrealism (and Dada) at the University of Alabama. - The best short introduction I can currently find, useful if you don't know what I meant by 'Exquisite Corpse' above.

My Aesthetic
This is a new section; at some point it will probably link into an essay on the site. Briefly, it comes down to the Simulated, or Total, Environment theory. I had always been attracted to this idea but didn't have the terms for it until I was a teenager. Then I realized that I didn't have anything in mind. I toyed with Neo-Victorianism, but it wasn't quite right. Then one day last spring I was watching a movie with my Than and it hit me. I had found my aesthetic. It's a combination of the environment of the future (usually a pseudo-dystopia, like Logan's Run,) parts of Doctor Who sets (imprinted into my young PBS-watching mind,) and other weird 60s-70s futuristic art and style that lingered in the books my parents had lying around, stuff on PBS, a little Danish Modern, and the hospice where I went to preschool when I was a wee Cobaltnine. In fact, for a while there was a particular kind of pattern which always faintly disturbed me, which I dimly remember from being in school there. (It's a circle and dot pattern, nothing particularly strange at all! But a lot more common before the 80s than since.)
Long story short (too late!). Have some links.
Modern Contemporary Design: It's like a design blog. Hit or miss, but a good percent of hits for me.
Land Living: In the same vein, but a bit more architechture. Speaking of which...
Monolithic Dome Institute: I want a dome. Someday, I say, someday.
Danish Modern design (BBC): This is a componant, but not the whole, of my design-mind.
Hexagons: This sums it all up. Except for the unisex jumpsuit part. I look awful in jumpsuits.
The Buckminster Fuller Institute: Too much to get into right now.

Computer Resources
Mozilla - I was a long time IE user; we all are, when we are young, stupid, and new to the web. IE is only something I use now to check my webpages. Mozilla is a far superior browser. After IE, I was using Opera. Opera was great, but has some faults in its newer builds - security, log-in problems, the impossibility of using PayPal because of both. Now if only Mozilla would build in a quick-change button (to view pages in one's own CSS) for those awful webpages...
HTMLSource : HTML Tutorials - Seriously, these pages are the reason my pages are, for the most part, W3C compliant. Searching almost always brings up not only what you want, but something else, more useful, that you didn't think of. I didn't even know that the font tag was depreciated until I went here, but instead of just saying that, it said 'so use the headings instead, and here's how to customize it so everything isn't in bold.' Highly recommended.
Pitr Stanicek's Color Tools (2004 versions) - There is one flaw to the color picker; if you like a main color, write down the hue/sat/lum, or you're never finding it again. Beyond that, this is FABULOUS.


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All pages should validate XHTML and CSS. Last updated 17 Feb 2005.
"So far as we are human, what we do must be either evil or good: so far as we do evil or good, we are human: and it is better, in a paradoxical way, to do evil than to do nothing: at least we exist." - T.S. Eliot